School activities for older children

Celebrate Children's Day with your class! Below are some great activities to help you get started.

Form a Children's Day project team

Invite children from different classes to form a Children's Day project team. This group can brainstorm activities for the school to celebrate Children's Day; talk at community forums; or discuss ways to get the whole community involved in the celebrations. Then make it happen!

Find out how other countries celebrate Children's Day

How do other countries celebrate Children's Day? Check out the download to find out. If you have experienced Children's Day in another country we would love to hear about it. Contact us and tell us about your experience.

School intergenerational games day

Have a school games day where parents, grandparents and children learn the games that each generation played as children.

Entertain younger children

Get older children to put on a play or learn how to read their favourite children's stories really well. Organise an outing to your nearest primary school to perform/read to the class as a Children's Day treat. They could even read out stories they have written themselves!

Organise a classroom debate

Have a classroom debate on a child-centred topic, eg ‘children should have the same rights as adults', or ‘Children's Day should be a national holiday'.

Research how children live in other countries

Assign each student a country. Get them to research how children live in that country and compare it to their own lives. Share findings with classmates.

Create a children's parliament

Your classroom could become a mini-parliament, with the classroom divided into three or four parties (determined by the students). Discussion and debate should be around youth issues.

Talk about children's rights

Read the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child together as a class. A copy can be found on the Office of the Children's Commissioner's website. There are also some great links and resources on the site that could form the basis of other class discussions or activities.